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PROGRAMME

- as of 20 November 2013 -

Sunday, 24 November
15.00-18.00 Guided tour of Berlinwith a focus on the history of the divestiture of trade unions in 1933, visit to historic sites
Bus shuttle:14.50, in front of BMZ, bus shuttle to the restaurant after the tour
18.00-21.00 Informal dinner, Restaurant Max und Moritz (Oranienstraße 16, Berlin)
Bus shuttle to BMZ and neighbouring hotels:21.00, outside the restaurant
Monday, 25 November
09.30-10.30 Coffee and Registration
10.30-10.45 Welcome by moderator John Morrison, Institute for Human Rights and Business, London, speaking on the aims of the conference
accompanied by short film reflecting different perspectives on living wages and the conference
10.45-11.05 Keynote speeches
  o Dirk Niebel, Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, Germany
  o Lilianne Ploumen, Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation, the      Netherlands
11.05-12.00 Living Wages – views from local and global perspectives
Speeches and discussion round

  o Mohammad Atiqul Islam, President of Bangladesh Garment Manufactures & Exporters      Association
  o Manuela Tomei, Director, Work Quality Department (ILO)
  o Ashim Roy, Asia Floor Wage Alliance
  o Roel Nieuwenkamp, Chair OECD Working Party on Responsible Business Conduct
  o Discussion with plenary (30min)
12.00-12.15 Keynote speech "Living wage - a shared responsibility"
Helena Helmersson, Head of Sustainability, Hennes&Mauritz
12.15-12.30 Consultation rounds and initiatives leading up to the European Conference on Living Wages: why are we here today?
Presentation by Pascalle Grotenhuis (MinBuZa) and Daniela Zehentner-Capell (BMZ)
12.30-13.30 Lunch
13.30-15.30 Presentation of previous approaches/initiatives on living wages
(Parallel workshops of 60 minutes each, participants choose one workshop per session, participants meet directly in the indicated rooms)
13.30-14.30 Session 1 (4 parallel workshops)
Garment sector Anne Lally (Fair Wear Foundation):
Living wage engineering: early work on factory and brand costing, retail pricing and fair distribution of increases to workers
Calculating a living wage Martin Guzi (WageIndicator Foundation) and Paulien Osse:
Calculating living wages and publishing labour market information
Commodities and agricultural standards organisations Wilbert Flinterman (FLO) and Edwin Koster (SAI):
Sustainability standards and living wages. Cooperation, methodology and results of pilot projects in South Africa and the Dominican Republic
Electronics sector Jenny Holdcroft (IndustriALL), Sabda Pranawa Djati, (ASPEK), Obon Tabroni (Federation of Indonesian Metal Workers' Union (FSPMI)):
How to optimize unions’ struggle for wage increase - lesson learned from Indonesia
14.30-15.30 Session 2 (4 parallel workshops)
Garment sector Clare Lissaman (Ethical Fashion Forum), and Stefan Niethammer (3Freunde):
Big Picture Thinking and Practical Realities
Calculating a living wage Doug Miller (Northumbria University, UK), Khondaker Golam Moazzem (Centre for Policy Dialogue, Bangladesh) and Claudia Schlangen (Berenschot):
Estimating a minimum living wage in the RMG Sector in Bangladesh
Commodities and agricultural standards organisations Sarah Roberts (Ethical Tea Partnership) and Rachel Wilshaw (Oxfam UK):
Living wages in the tea sector, gaining an understanding from a four-country study
Garment sector Johannes Ritter:
Work to live or live to live - The Business Case for a living wage.
15.30-16.00 Coffee
16.00-16.45 Presentation of Draft Action Plan on living wages
  o Presentation of the Draft Action Plan by Jos Huber (MinBuZa) and Verena Wiesner (BMZ)
  o Global perspective and the action plan by Daniel Vaughan-Whitehead (ILO)
  o Reactions to Draft Action Plan and Q&A in plenary, with Daniel Vaughan- Whitehead (ILO)      and Doug Miller (Northumbria University, UK)
16.45-18.00 Four parallel discussion groups (according to areas of action from Draft Action Plan), Please choose among:
  o Transparency with regard to wages
  o Freedom of association, unionization & collective bargaining
  o Practices of buyers & suppliers
  o Political commitment
(Each group will discuss in a workshop room and have a chosen rapporteur that presents results in plenary)
18.00-18.30 Presentation of first results of discussion groups in plenary and closing
19.00-22.00 Dinner reception at the GIZ Representation (Reichpietschufer 20, 10785 Berlin)
  o Welcome by Klaus Brückner, Director of the GIZ Representation Berlin
  o Cultural programme, “Nativa Brasilia Band”
Tuesday, 26 November
09.00-09.15 Welcome, recap of first day and start into second day,
including interview with Nazma Akter, General Secretary & Executive Director Awaj Foundation, Bangladesh
09.15-10.00 Introductory Speeches and Interview, followed by Q&A
  o Interview, Robin Cornelius, CEO of the Swiss textile company Switcher and (10min)
  o Speech, Lorenz Berzau, Managing Director of BSCI: Engaging business in living wage      initiatives (8min)
  o Speech, Obon Tabroni, Vice President of the Federation of Indonesian Metal Workers’      Union (FSPMI) (8min)
  o Q&A with plenary (20min)
10.00-10.30 Presentation of Discussion results on the Draft Action Plan
10.30-11.00 Presentation of a Declaration of Intent on living wages and group picture
by government representatives Uta Böllhoff (BMZ) and Jos Huber (MinBuZa)
11.00-11.30 Coffee
11.30-12.10 Starting with action I (in plenary):
Presentation of inspiring follow-up initiatives (4x 10min)
Group 1: Developing a follow-up approach to foster living wages in the industrial sector in a                 project country proposed by the BMZ
Group 2: Ethical Tea Partnership: success factors and challenges of multi-stakeholder                 cooperation on wages in the tea sector
Group 3: ISEAL and standard organisations: living wages in standards
Group 4: Space for open discussion: creating new living wage alliances by exchanging                 demand and supply of different organisations
12.10-13.10 Lunch
13.10-14.40 Starting with action II (in groups):
Interactive parallel sessions with representatives on the activities presented previously
Group 1: Follow-up approach on living wages in the industrial sector
Group 2: Living income in the tea sector
Group 3: Standards and living wages/living income
Group 4: Moderated discussion on alternative projects
(Please meet in the indicated workshop rooms, coffee will be available during the group sessions)
14.45-15.30 Starting with action III (in plenary)
Recap and outlook
  o Results of group discussions on follow-up activities (4x5min)
  o Upcoming related events (10min)
  o Further outlook and perspectives (15min)
15.30-16.00 Closing ceremony of the conference
  o Rudi Delarue, DG Employment, Social Affairs & Inclusion, European Commission
  o Gudrun Kopp, Parliamentary State Secretary, Germany

The conference will be held in English only.
Participans are invited to complimentary coffee breaks, lunch and evening reception.

Monday, 25 November
13.30-14.30 Session 1 (4 parallel workshops)
Garment sector

Living wage engineering: early work on factory and brand costing, retail pricing and fair distribution of increases to workers

Presenter: Anne Lally (Fair Wear Foundation):

Fair Wear Foundation will share outcomes of its ongoing efforts to find practical answers to some of the questions that have impeded implementation of living wages in the garment industry. In the workshop, we will focus on three key questions our work seeks to address: By how much do current wages differ from a living wage? How would paying living wages affect prices in the garment industry (for brands and consumers)? And, when a decision has been made to pay more how do we ensure that workers receive the money? FWF’s Anne Lally will present – with input from Doug Miller of Northumbria University regarding his research for FWF on distribution in Bangladesh, and with summary comments and vision for the future by FWF partner Per Bondevik of Ethical Trade Initiative Norway.

Calculating a living wage

WageIndicator Foundation: Calculating living wages and publishing labour market information

Presenters: Martin Guzi, Paulien Osse (WageIndicator Foundation)

The Wage Indicator Foundation contributes to the living wage discussion and suggests a method to calculate living wage globally. The calculation is based on transparent and simple principles. The proposed WageIndicator approach is innovative in the way that it uses prices collected through WageIndicator and Numbeo web-surveys. Online survey tools can be a very cost-effective way for gathering data quickly and easily. The data collection through one central system is very efficient when current global overview is needed. The proposed methodology is sufficiently flexible to be easily extended and used by municipalities, corporations and universities interested in estimating their own living wage rate on the basis of their own set of assumptions.

Commodities and agricultural standards organisations

Standards Organisations’ Cooperation on Living Wages

Presenters: Wilbert Flinterman (FLO) and Edwin Koster (SAI).

Fairtrade International (FLO), GoodWeave, Utz Certified, Rainforest Alliance/Sustainable Agriculture Network (SAN) and Social Accountability International (SAI), have agreed on a definition and basic methodology for living wage benchmarks that was developed in partnership with Richard Anker & Associates. The methodology is path-breaking for its suitability in both industrial and agricultural settings. It is being tested, refined and described via a series of pilots in various countries. The joined approach and pilot results will be presented by Wilbert Flinterman (FLO) and Edwin Koster (SAI).

Electronics sector

How to optimize unions’ struggle for wage increase - lesson learned from Indonesia

Presenters: Jenny Holdcroft (IndustriALL), Sabda Pranawa Djati, (ASPEK), Obon Tabroni (Federation of Indonesian Metal Workers' Union (FSPMI)):

The minimum wage in Indonesia belongs to the lower ranks within South East Asia region, only above Cambodia and Vietnam. And poverty is still high with 28 Mio people, or 11,6% of the 241 Mio population. On the contrary, Indonesian economic growth of 5,9% is worldwide the second highest after China. Unfortunately, the government economic policy as proclaimed in the last month APEC summit in Bali clearly speaks for prioritising economic growth and market liberalisation and very less talk about the need to develop a sustainable living wage mechanism which guarantees workers social welfare.
The current law on wage determination stipulates that yearly minimum wage must be the outcome of a tripartite negotiation within the wage council on the provincial and district/ city levels. The percentage increase in the capital Jakarta is usually the benchmark for wage increases in other provinces. Not until two years ago the wage increases were not much higher than the inflation rate. The remarkable breakthrough of 30-50% increase in 2012 and 2013 was only possible due to the massive organising and pressure of unions. However the achieved increased wage in 2013 had not increased workers’ purchasing power, but only saved them from another possible fall back to poverty. And for the wage increase 2014 the results are not so much promising, despite of various actions of unions.
Workers took several initiatives to challenge the wage determination for 2014, either via lobby work, negotiations, and massive mass actions but above all with the help of a living wage survey in 14 provinces/cities. Especially the living wage survey came up with concrete recommendations to improve the quality of minimum wage. Nonetheless the next year presidential and parliament election will likely influence the process on wage negotiations, which put another challange to the union movement. On this stake, every suggestion to Indonesian unions on how to secure the persistent efforts towards achieving decent wages is most welcome.

14.30-15.30 Session 2 (4 parallel workshops)
Garment sector

Big Picture Thinking and Practical Realities

Presenters: Clare Lissaman (Ethical Fashion Forum) and Stefan Niethammer (3Freunde)

Exploring steps to a living wage. Showcasing strategies some apparel brands, retailers and suppliers are taking. What impact is this having on factories/production units and workers? This will be a practical workshop where attendees can share their experiences and learn from others. Facilitated by Stefan Niethammer of 3FREUNDE, who aim to make 'the best t-shirt in the world', and Clare Lissaman of the Ethical Fashion Forum, the industry body for sustainable fashion, representing over 6000 members in more than 100 countries.

Calculating a living wage

Estimating a minimum living wage in the RMG Sector in Bangladesh

Presenters: Dr. K.G. Moazzem (Centre for Policy Dialogue, Bangladesh), Doug Miller (Northumbria University, UK) and Claudia Schlangen (Berenschot, Netherlands)

Berenschot and the Centre for Policy Dialogue have calculated living wages for the Bangladeshi Ready-Made Garment industry. The research took place in the context tripartite wage negotiations between workers and employers in the Minimum Wage Board for sector, that took place between May and November of this year. In the workshop we will explain the outcomes of the calculation, the methodologies used, and the recommendations we made to the Minimum Wage Board. We will furthermore discuss the outcome of the wage negotiations and the consequences for the industry, as well as the research needs for brands and retailers.

Commodities and agricultural standards organisations

Partnerships to achieve living wage - their necessity, the messy reality and how to make them work

Presenter: Sarah Roberts (Ethical Tea Partnership) and Rachel Wilshaw (Oxfam UK)

Sarah Roberts, Executive Director of the Ethical Tea Partnership and Rachel Wilshaw, Ethical Trade Manager for Oxfam GB will share their experience of building a consensus and coalition to progress work on living wage in the tea sector and outline what has been achieved so far. Hear their real life experience of how to:
Take that first leap of faith and then make it work – how do you move from distrust/    incomprehension to working together
Manage the rollercoaster ride – how do you maintain trust when you have different    perspectives and constraints – and all you want to do is scream down the phone at each    other
Not get shot by your own side – as your understanding of the issues and    comprehension of other organisations challenges increases, how to do you make sure    you can keep your continue to bring your own constituencies along with you
Make sure they are worth it – these type of partnerships are time-consuming and can be    very stressful, how do you make sure all the effort actually delivers results

Garment sector

Work to live or live to live - The Business Case for a living wage

Presenters: Johannes Ritter (Solution Matrix)

A fair day's pay for a fair day's work. What takes more labor to produce a T-Shirt or an automobile? Seems obvious, but how come that the labor cost of a car is 20% and a T-Shirt only 14% of the retail price? The actual labor content of a T-Shirt is only 39 cents and we will discuss ways on how to improve on this. Based on a 3 year programme in Bangladesh and India, which dramatically improved working conditions and wages for textile workers, we will examine the living wage. A business case for textile procurement will demonstrate, that it is not only possible to increase living wages dramatically, but improve quality and productivity.

Tuesday, 26 November
11.30-12.10 Starting with action I (in plenary): Presentation of inspiring follow-up approaches
Group 1:

BMZ: Developing a follow-up approach to foster living wages in the industrial sector

More Information on this workshop will be available soon!

Group 2:

Achieving living wage and living income in the tea sector

Presenter: Sarah Roberts (Ethical Tea Partnership)

Sarah Roberts, Executive Director of the Ethical Tea Partnership will provide an overview of the action that is currently being taken to address living wage issues in tea producing countries, outline the wider partnership that is emerging to help achieve living wage and living income across the tea sector and explain how you can get involved.

Group 3:

Starting with Action: Standards Organisations and Living Wages

Presenter: Kristin Komives (ISEAL Alliance)

Kristin Komives of the ISEAL Alliance will provide an overview of the work that six sustainability standard systems -- Fairtrade International, GoodWeave, Utz Certified, Rainforest Alliance/Sustainable Agriculture Network, Forest Stewardship Council and Social Accountability International – are doing together around living wage. Kristin will describe the steps already taken and introduce ideas for future collaboration within this group and with other partners.

Group 4:

Space for open discussion: creating new living wage alliances by exchanging demand and supply of different organisations

More Information on this workshop will be available soon!

12.10-13.10 Lunch
13.10-14.40 Starting with action II (in groups): Interactive parallel sessions with representatives on the activities presented previously
(Please meet in the indicated workshop rooms, coffee will be served during the group sessions)
Group 1:

Follow-up approach on living wages in the industrial sector

More Information on this workshop will be available soon!

Group 2:

Living income in the tea sector

More Information on this workshop will be available soon!

Group 3:

Standards and living wages/living income

More Information on this workshop will be available soon!

Group 4:

Moderated discussion on alternative projects

More Information on this workshop will be available soon!